Kosmos (signed - last copy)

by Joji Morita


Photographs: Joji Morita

Publisher: Sokyu-sha

56 pages

Pictures: 49 black and white images

Year: 2014

Comments: edition of 550, softcover with slipcase

sold out

It is said that Pythagoras was the first philosopher in ancient Greece to use the term “Kosmos” in reference to the universe. The word “kosmos” in ancient Greek refers to a congruent balance or order. A state of harmony present in a garden, in societal law or the human spirit may be described as “Kata Kosmon,” that is, “in accord with the cosmos.”

Looking down below from higher ground, you perceive the city as a physical cluster, a sense you cannot get while walking within it. The roads have a sensation of speed, like blood vessels circulating vital energy to conduct that power to the farthest ends, while jumbled layers of elevated roads and pedestrian overpasses are reminiscent of the intertwined bundles of muscular fiber. Portions of ground excavated for construction are as open wounds, not meant to be seen.

And in each of these parts are the subtle movements of small human beings, like red blood cells. Contrasted, the uniform buildings aligned in regular rows appear like beautiful inorganic crystals. In the details here too, are signs and traces of human activity, everywhere. Each of these activities together mount to a limitless multitude, forming a harmonious eddy, or a beautiful crystallization, growing into yet another, different, cluster


more books tagged »black and white« | >> see all

more books tagged »Japanese« | >> see all

A collector's choice by josefchladek.com

Kosmos (signed - last copy)

by Joji Morita


Photographs: Joji Morita

Publisher: Sokyu-sha

56 pages

Pictures: 49 black and white images

Year: 2014

Comments: edition of 550, softcover with slipcase

sold out

It is said that Pythagoras was the first philosopher in ancient Greece to use the term “Kosmos” in reference to the universe. The word “kosmos” in ancient Greek refers to a congruent balance or order. A state of harmony present in a garden, in societal law or the human spirit may be described as “Kata Kosmon,” that is, “in accord with the cosmos.”

Looking down below from higher ground, you perceive the city as a physical cluster, a sense you cannot get while walking within it. The roads have a sensation of speed, like blood vessels circulating vital energy to conduct that power to the farthest ends, while jumbled layers of elevated roads and pedestrian overpasses are reminiscent of the intertwined bundles of muscular fiber. Portions of ground excavated for construction are as open wounds, not meant to be seen.

And in each of these parts are the subtle movements of small human beings, like red blood cells. Contrasted, the uniform buildings aligned in regular rows appear like beautiful inorganic crystals. In the details here too, are signs and traces of human activity, everywhere. Each of these activities together mount to a limitless multitude, forming a harmonious eddy, or a beautiful crystallization, growing into yet another, different, cluster


more books tagged »black and white« | >> see all

more books tagged »Japanese« | >> see all

A collector's choice by josefchladek.com

Kosmos (signed - last copy)

by Joji Morita


Photographs: Joji Morita

Publisher: Sokyu-sha

56 pages

Pictures: 49 black and white images

Year: 2014

Comments: edition of 550, softcover with slipcase

sold out

It is said that Pythagoras was the first philosopher in ancient Greece to use the term “Kosmos” in reference to the universe. The word “kosmos” in ancient Greek refers to a congruent balance or order. A state of harmony present in a garden, in societal law or the human spirit may be described as “Kata Kosmon,” that is, “in accord with the cosmos.”

Looking down below from higher ground, you perceive the city as a physical cluster, a sense you cannot get while walking within it. The roads have a sensation of speed, like blood vessels circulating vital energy to conduct that power to the farthest ends, while jumbled layers of elevated roads and pedestrian overpasses are reminiscent of the intertwined bundles of muscular fiber. Portions of ground excavated for construction are as open wounds, not meant to be seen.

And in each of these parts are the subtle movements of small human beings, like red blood cells. Contrasted, the uniform buildings aligned in regular rows appear like beautiful inorganic crystals. In the details here too, are signs and traces of human activity, everywhere. Each of these activities together mount to a limitless multitude, forming a harmonious eddy, or a beautiful crystallization, growing into yet another, different, cluster


more books tagged »black and white« | >> see all

more books tagged »Japanese« | >> see all

A collector's choice by josefchladek.com